Nowadays, we find ourselves busier and busier with everyday life, and social media provides an excellent way of staying up to date with what’s going on in the world around us. However, in the age of technology, newspapers are finding themselves more and more redundant, used more as a fly swatter or coffee coaster than an informative product fashioned out of hard work and time. Gone are the days of broadsheets that doubled up as a duvet and fingers covered in ink. We use online uploads as a more convenient way of keeping up with current events.

Last year, national newspapers lost on average half a million pounds in sales, seeing drops of up to 10% in some cases, while national online publications are becoming more and more popular. The birth of completely digital outlets such as Buzzfeed and the Huffington Post sends the paper-based format even further into decline, by offering a more popular approach to news, with more of an opportunity for voicing an opinion rather than simply stating the facts.

However the rise of online outlets is not without risk. With so many resources and publications, fake news can infiltrate our timelines very easily, and we find ourselves subject to scams and spoofs. We find that although it is quicker to update ourselves using a smartphone, we spend just as much time rifling through the dubious stories to get to the ones that matter, and whilst trees may be thankful for our distraction, we are still moving further and further away from reliable sources and trustworthy outlets.

We have become so engrossed in keeping up to date and on top of everything that we forget what is actually being said, who is saying it and why.